Massimo Riccaboni (IMT Lucca)

International Economics

This course introduces students to the analyses of the most important up-to-date topics in international economics. The objective is to gain an in-depth understanding of the causes and consequences of economic globalization. Emphasis will be given on the internationalization strategies of firms, the organization of production in a global economy, and consequences on labor markets.

Decision-Making in Economics and Management

The main goals of the course are:
(1) to take economic theories and methodologies out into the world, applying them to interesting questions of individual behavior and societal outcomes;
(2) to develop a basic understanding of human psychology and social dynamics as they apply to marketing contexts;
(3) to become familiar with the major theory and research methods for analyzing consumer behavior;
(4) to develop market analytics insight into consumer actions.

Analytics in Economics and Management

The aim of this course is to teach students how to produce a research paper in economics and management using hands-on empirical tools for different data structures. We will bridge the gap between applications of methods in published papers and practical lessons for producing your own research. After introductions to up-to-date illustrative contributions to literature, students will be asked to perform their own analyses and comment results after applications to microdata provided during the course

Decision-Making in Economics and Management

The main goals of the course are:

(1) to take economic theories and methodologies out into the world, applying them to interesting questions of individual behavior and societal outcomes;

(2) to develop a basic understanding of human psychology and social dynamics as they apply to marketing contexts;

(3) to become familiar with the major theory and research methods for analyzing consumer behavior;

(4) to develop market analytics insight into consumer actions.

International Economics and Business

This course, as its name suggests, is comprised of two main sections, the first being international economics and the second being international business. In the first section, we focus our attention on the real (as opposed to monetary) side of international economics, i.e., international trade of goods and services. We start from the two neoclassical trade models (Ricardo and Heckscher-Ohlin) that were developed in the early parts of the 19th and 20th centuries. We then move to the more recent ?new?