Economics, Networks and Business Analytics

Scientific Writing, Dissemination and Evaluation (long seminar without exam)

In order to ensure their widest possible dissemination, research results need to be presented in academic publications and in talks. The first goal of this course is to introduce students to basic principles of academic writing and on basic techniques to plan and deliver good academic talks. In addition, the course discusses the key principles of peer review, which is what makes science reliable knowledge. In particular, the course focuses on how to write a professional referee report.

Science Integrity and Misconduct

1. Introduction
a. The age of scientific fraud
b. FFP (Fabrication, Falsification, Plagiarism)
c. Error, misconduct, fraud

2. Great scientists, successful cheaters
a. Is scientific fraud a new phenomenon?
b. Accused: famous scientists were fraudsters?
c. Present vs past

3. Fraudulent images
a. Scientific images as data
b. Introduction to fraudulent image manipulation
c. Image manipulation detection
d. Large scale analysis of image manipulation

Philosophy of Science (long seminar without exam)

This is an introduction to the basic concepts and problems in the analysis of scientific reasoning and inquiry. The course will focus on some central patterns of reasoning and argumentation which in science and critically discuss their features and limitations. Topics covered include the nature of theory and evidence, the logic of theory testing, and the debate about the aims of science and the trustworthiness of scientific results.

Optimal Control

Discrete-time optimal control: dynamic programming for finite/infinite horizon and deterministic/stochastic optimization problems. LQ and LQG problems, Riccati equations, Kalman filter. Deterministic continuous-time optimal control: the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation and the Pontryagin?s principle. Examples of optimal control problems in economics.
An economic application of optimal control: a dynamic limit pricing model of the firm.

Numerical Optimization

Optimization plays a key role in solving a large variety of decision problems that arise in engineering (design, process operations, embedded systems), data science, machine learning, business analytics, finance, economics, and many others. This course focuses on formulating optimization models and on the most popular numerical methods to solve them.

Numerical Methods for the Solution of Partial Differential Equations

The course introduces numerical methods for the approximate solution of initial and boundary value problems governed by linear partial differential equations (PDEs) ubiquitous in physics, engineering, and quantitative finance. The fundamentals of the finite difference method and of the finite element method are introduced step-by-step in reference to exemplary model problems related to heat conduction, linear elasticity, and pricing of stock options in finance. Notions on numerical differentiation, numerical integration, interpolation, and time integration schemes are provided.

Management of Complex Systems: Approaches to Problem Solving

Methods and approach to problem solving. Problem analysis; analysis of complex systems (related to cultural heritage, such as a city of art organization, promotion, etc.). The course will include practical simulations. The course will be linked to a seminar on specific case studies.

Introduction to Complex Systems and Networks

Complexity, self-similarity, scaling, self-organised criticality.
Definition of graphs, real networks and their properties.
Models of static networks, models of network growth.

Lecture 01 Graph Theory Introduction
Lecture 02 Properties of Complex Networks
Lecture 03 Communities
Lecture 04 Different Kind of Graphs
Lecture 05 Ranking
Lecture 06 Static Models of Graphs
Lecture 07 Dynamical Models of Graphs
Lecture 08 Fitness Models
Lecture 09 World Trade Web
Lecture 10 Financial Networks

Introduction to Cognitive and Social Psyschology

This course will provide an introduction to general themes in Cognitive and Social Psychology. In the first part of the course, we will review seminal findings that had a major impact on our knowledge of cognitive processes and social interactions, as well as more recent studies that took advantage of neuroimaging, electrophysiology and brain stimulation methods to shed new light on decision-making and social behaviors.