Trustworthy Global Computing    IMT Alti Studi Lucca - Lucca Institute for Advanced Studies
November 7-9, 2006, Lucca, Italy
TGC 2006
TGC 2006
"call_for_papers", "Invited Speakers" => "invited_speakers", "EU FP6 Reviews" => "events", "Venue" => "venue", "Steering Committee" => "steering_committee", "Program Committee" => "program_committee", "Local Organization" => "local_organization", "Program" => "program", "Sponsors" => "sponsors", "Pictures" => "pictures" ); foreach ($right_nav as $heading => $param) { if (!isset($_GET['topic']) || $_GET['topic'] != $param) { ?>"; } else { $href_close = ""; } ?>
TGC 2005
Post-Proceedings

Welcome to the TGC 2006


TGC 2006, the second symposium on Trustworthy Global Computing, was held in the medieval Tuscan town of Lucca (Italy), on November 7 - 9, 2006. The symposium was co-located with the reviews of EU FET-IST FP6 Projects AEOLUS, MOBIUS, SENSORIA and CATNETS

The programme of TGC also included overviews of the main research activities carried on by each of the four FP6 Projects and the presentation of three FP7 initiatives named Internet of the future, Pervasive adaptation and ICT forever yours.
The first TGC event took place in Edinburgh on April 7-9, 2005 with the co-sponsorship of IFIP TC-2, as part of ETAPS 2005. TGC 2005 was the evolution of the previous Global Computing I Workshops held in Rovereto in 2003 and 2004 (see e.g. LNCS 2874) and the workshops on Foundation of Global Computing held as satellite events of ICALP and Concur (see e.g. ENTCS Vol. 85). In view of the importance and the strategic role of trustworthy global computing, the plans are to organize TGC regularly in the future, with the following steering commmittee.

Call for Papers

Important Dates

Abstract submissions: July 31, 2006
Paper submissions: August 4, 2006
Notification to authors: September 16, 2006
Final version due: October 13, 2006
Conference: November 7-9, 2006

Scope

Computing technology has become ubiquitous, from global applications to minuscule embedded devices. Trust in computing is vital to help protect public safety, national security, and economic prosperity. A new area of research, known as global computing, has recently emerged. It aims to define new models of computation based on code and data mobility over wide area networks with highly dynamic topologies, and to provide infrastructures to support coordination and control of components originating from different, possibly untrusted, sources. Trustworthy Global Computing aims to achieve safe and reliable computation in such a framework, by providing tools and frameworks for constructing well-behaved applications and for reasoning about their behaviour and properties.
In 2005, the FET-IST Programme of the European Union launched three Integrated Projects dedicated to these themes within the Global Computing II proactive initiative. These projects are now due to be reviewed after their first year of activity. This symposium will be devoted to presenting and discussing recent progress in trustworthy global computing within these projects and beyond. We are looking for papers dealing with the following issues (the list should not be considered exhaustive):
-- theories, models and algorithms for global computing and service oriented computing
-- language-based security, theories of trust and authentication
-- secure protocol composition
-- security through verifiable evidence
-- game-theoretic approaches to selfishness and security
-- resource usage and information flow policies
-- privacy, reliability and business integrity
-- access control and mechanisms for enforcement
-- models of interaction and dynamic components management
-- sharing information and computation
-- self configuration and adaptiveness
-- efficient communication
-- verification of cryptographic protocols
-- language concepts and abstraction mechanisms
-- test generators, symbolic interpreters, type checkers
-- finite state model checkers, theorem provers
-- software principles to support debugging and verification

Format

The symposium is colocated with the reviews of the following FP6 GCII projects:

Invited Speakers

Paola Inverardi (Università de L'Aquila, Italy)
Danny Krizanc (Wesleyan University, USA)
Jayadev Misra (University of Texas at Austin, USA)
Andrei Sabelfeld (Goteborg University, Sweden)

Origins & Plans

The first TGC event took place in Edinburgh on April 7-9, 2005 with the co-sponsorship of IFIP TC-2, as part of ETAPS 2005. TGC 2005 was the evolution of the previous Global Computing I Workshops held in Rovereto in 2003 and 2004 (see e.g. LNCS 2874) and the workshops on Foundation of Global Computing held as satellite events of ICALP and Concur (see e.g. ENTCS Vol. 85). In view of the importance and the strategic role of trustworthy global computing, the plans are to organize TGC regularly in the future, with the following steering commmittee.

Steering Committee

Gilles Barthe (INRIA Sophia Antipolis)
Rocco De Nicola (University of Florence)
Christos Kaklamanis (University of Patras)
Ugo Montanari (University of Pisa)
Davide Sangiorgi (University of Bologna)
Don Sannella (University of Edinburgh)
Vladimiro Sassone (University of Southampton)
Martin Wirsing (University of Munich)

Submission Details

Contributions must be in PostScript or PDF and consist of no more than 15 pages in the Springer LNCS style. Proofs omitted due to space limitations may be included in a clearly marked appendix. Submitted papers must describe work unpublished in refereed venues, and not submitted for publication elsewhere.

Proceedings and Special Issue

The Proceedings will be published by Springer Verlag in the LNCS series, shortly after the conference, to give the authors the opportunity to take into account discussions and suggestions at the conference. Pre-proceedings with the accepted papers, printed locally in Lucca, will be made available at the conference. It is planned to dedicate a special issue of the journal Theoretical Computer Science to the theme of the workshop, comprised of extended versions of the best papers presented at TGC 2006.

Program Chairs

Ugo Montanari - Dipartimento di Informatica, University of Pisa, ugo@di.unipi.it
Don Sannella - Laboratory for Foundations of Computer Science, University of Edinburgh, dts@inf.ed.ac.uk

Program Committee

Gilles Barthe (INRIA Sophia Antipolis)
Rocco De Nicola (University of Florence)
José Luiz Fiadeiro (University of Leicester)
Stefania Gnesi (ISTI, Pisa)
Manuel Hermenegildo (Technical University of Madrid)
Christos Kaklamanis (University of Patras)
Elias Koutsoupias (University of Athens)
Burkhard Monien (University of Paderborn)
Giuseppe Persiano (University of Salerno)
Ugo Montanari (University of Pisa)
David Rosenblum (University College London)
Davide Sangiorgi (University of Bologna)
Don Sannella (University of Edinburgh)
Vladimiro Sassone (University of Southampton)
Paul Spirakis (University of Patras)
Martin Wirsing (University of Munich)
Gianluigi Zavattaro (University of Bologna)

Local Organization

Massimo Bartoletti (University of Pisa)
Roberto Bruni (University of Pisa) - chair
Marzia Buscemi (IMT Lucca)
Hernán Melgratti (IMT Lucca)
Laura Semini (University of Pisa)
Roberta Zelari (IMT Lucca)
Barbara Iacobino (IMT Lucca)
Silvia Lucchesi (IMT Lucca)
Pietro Carubbi (IMT Lucca)

Venue

Lucca is a medieval Tuscan town, in an intermediate position between Pisa and Florence, with fully preserved renaissance city walls. Lucca has maintained the characteristics of the small capital it was almost up to the unification of Italy. Beyond the hills, the nearby beaches of Versilia, the marble quarries of Carrara and the mountains of Garfagnana complete the picture. The IMT Institute for Advanced Studies (http://www.imtlucca.it) is a recently established graduate school active in economics, political science, handling of cultural heritage, biorobotics and computer science. The PhD program on Computer Science and Engineering focuses on various issues of global computing.

Invited Speakers


 Paola Inverardi
Paola Inverardi (Università de L'Aquila, Italy)
Software of the future is the future of Software?
Software in the near ubiquitous future (Softure) will need to cope with variability, as software systems get deployed on an increasingly large diversity of computing platforms. Heterogeneity of the underlying communication and computing infrastructure, mobility and continuously evolving requirements demand new software paradigms that span the entire life-cycle from development to deployment and execution. Softure must be developed in a way that facilitates both its deployment over heterogeneous networks of heterogeneous nodes, and its interaction with end users, their environment and/or other existing systems, depending on the application domain. Moreover, Softure should be reliable and meet the user’s performance requirements and needs. Softure can greatly differ in nature, varying from complex and distributed software systems for highly dynamic networks of mobile nodes to embedded software systems for wireless, resource-constrained nodes. Additionally, the user-centric dimension of the new emerging applications requires Softure to be adaptive to a context that combines user-centric data (e.g., what is the information of interest for the user given his/her current situation?) and resource/computer-centric data (e.g., what is the service that can be delivered to the user given available energy?). Finally, due to its pervasiveness, Softure must be dependable, which is made more complex given the highly dynamic nature of service provision.

Supporting the development and execution of Softure systems raises numerous challenges, from elaborating languages, methods and tools for the systems’ thorough design and validation in order to ensure dependability of the self-adaptive systems that are targeted, to developing supporting middleware infrastructures in order to ease the implementation and deployment of the target systems on highly heterogeneous and dynamic platforms.

Are these challenges new in the software domain? Do their solutions suggest innovative ways of creating software systems?

In this talk I will discuss some of these challenges making reference to the approach undertaken in the IST PLASTIC project for a specific instance of Softure focused on software for Beyond 3G (B3G) networks. I will try to highlight what I consider innovative and futurist for software and what I simply consider software for the future.
 Danny Krizanc
Danny Krizanc (Wesleyan University, USA)
An Algorithmic Theory of Autonomous Mobile Agent Computing
Mobile agents are software entities with the ability to move from node to node in a network acting autonomously and in cooperation with other agents in order to accomplish a variety of tasks. Today they find applications in numerous computer environments such as search in peer-to-peer networks, Web crawlers, and surveillance of local area networks, just to mention a few. Interest in mobile agents has been fueled by two overriding concerns. First, to simplify the complexities of distributed computing, and second to overcome the limitations of user interfaces. In this talk we examine mobile agents from the perspective of traditional research on the complexity of distributed algorithms. We attempt to provide a framework for an algorithmic theory of mobile agent computing. Recent research in the area is examined within this framework.
 Jayadev Misra
Jayadev Misra (University of Texas at Austin, USA)
Structured Concurrent Programming
Orc is a new language for task orchestration, a form of concurrent programming with applications in workflow, business process management, and web service orchestration. Orc provides constructs to orchestrate the concurrent invocation of services -- while managing time-outs, priorities, and failure of services or communication. In this talk, we give a tutorial introduction to Orc and then show a trace-based semantic model. Orc enjoys a number of properties, such as monotonicity and continuity, which are more common in functional programming. Despite the simplicity of the language and its semantic model, Orc is able to express a large variety of useful orchestration tasks.
 Andrei Sabelfeld
Andrei Sabelfeld (Goteborg University, Sweden)
Dimensions of Declassification in Theory and Practice
Computing systems often deliberately release (or declassify) sensitive information. A principal security concern for systems permitting information release is whether this release is safe: is it possible that the attacker compromises the information release mechanism and extracts more secret information than intended?
While the security community has recognized the importance of the problem, the state-of-the-art in information release is, unfortunately, a number of approaches with somewhat unconnected semantic goals. We provide a road map of the main directions of current research, by classifying the basic goals according to what information is released, who releases information, where in the system information is released, and when information can be released.
We apply this classification in order to evaluate the security of the largest case study realized in a security-typed language to date -- an implementation of a non-trivial cryptographic protocol that allows playing online poker without a trusted third party.
In addition, we identify some prudent principles of declassification. These principles shed light on existing definitions and may also serve as useful "sanity checks" for emerging models.
The talk is based on an IEEE CSFW'05 paper written jointly with David Sands and an ESORICS'05 paper written jointly with Aslan Askarov.

EU FP6 Reviews


The symposium was colocated with the reviews of the following FP6 GCII projects:

VENUE

Lucca is a medieval Tuscan town, in an intermediate position between Pisa and Florence, with fully preserved renaissance city walls. Lucca has maintained the characteristics of the small capital it was almost up to the unification of Italy. Beyond the hills, the nearby beaches of Versilia, the marble quarries of Carrara and the mountains of Garfagnana complete the picture.

The IMT Institute for Advanced Studies is a recently established graduate school active in economics, political science, handling of cultural heritage, biorobotics and computer science. The PhD program on Computer Science and Engineering focuses on various issues of global computing.

STEERING COMMITTEE


Gilles Barthe (INRIA Sophia Antipolis)
Rocco De Nicola (University of Florence)
Christos Kaklamanis (University of Patras)
Ugo Montanari (University of Pisa)
Davide Sangiorgi (University of Bologna)
Don Sannella (University of Edinburgh)
Vladimiro Sassone (University of Southampton)
Martin Wirsing (University of Munich)

PROGRAM CHAIRS

Ugo Montanari - Dipartimento di Informatica, University of Pisa, ugo@di.unipi.it
Don Sannella - Laboratory for Foundations of Computer Science, University of Edinburgh, dts@inf.ed.ac.uk

PROGRAM COMMITTEE

Gilles Barthe (INRIA Sophia Antipolis)
Rocco De Nicola (University of Florence)
José Luiz Fiadeiro (University of Leicester)
Stefania Gnesi (ISTI, Pisa)
Manuel Hermenegildo (Technical University of Madrid)
Christos Kaklamanis (University of Patras)
Elias Koutsoupias (University of Athens)
Burkhard Monien (University of Paderborn)
Giuseppe Persiano (University of Salerno)
Ugo Montanari (University of Pisa)
David Rosenblum (University College London)
Davide Sangiorgi (University of Bologna)
Don Sannella (University of Edinburgh)
Vladimiro Sassone (University of Southampton)
Paul Spirakis (University of Patras)
Martin Wirsing (University of Munich)
Gianluigi Zavattaro (University of Bologna)

LOCAL ORGANIZATION


Massimo Bartoletti (University of Pisa)
Roberto Bruni (University of Pisa) - chair
Marzia Buscemi (IMT Lucca)
Hernán Melgratti (IMT Lucca)
Laura Semini (University of Pisa)
Roberta Zelari (IMT Lucca)
Barbara Iacobino (IMT Lucca)
Silvia Lucchesi (IMT Lucca)
Pietro Carubbi (IMT Lucca)

Submission Guidelines

Electronic Submission

Prospective authors are invited to submit full papers in English presenting original research, unpublished in refereed venues, and not submitted for publication elsewhere. Submissions must be received in two stages:
  • registration and submission of title + abstract by July 31, 2006,
  • submission of full paper by August 4, 2006.
Both deadlines are strict. Contributions must be in PDF (preferably) or PS (using Type 1 fonts), and consist of no more than 15 pages, including references, in the Springer LNCS style available at the URL
http://www.springer.de/comp/lncs/authors.html.
It is recommended that submissions adhere to the specified format and length. Proofs omitted due to space limitations may be included in a clearly marked appendix that is not included in the page limit. Submissions that are clearly too long may be rejected immediately. Electronic submission is very strongly recommended. The submission server will be set up by Monday July 17, 2006 and submissions will be accepted till Friday August 4, 2006 (deadline is STRICT). The submission tool is available at
http://www.easychair.org/TGC06
Note that in order to submit a paper you need to register first, filling the form available in the New User part of the welcome page of the tool. After registration you will receive via e-mail the password that you can use to actually upload your abstract and paper.

Proceedings and Special Issue

LNCS logo
All accepted papers will be included in the proceedings and published by Springer Verlag in the LNCS series, both electronic and hard-copy, shortly after the conference, to give the authors the opportunity to take into account discussions and suggestions at the conference. Pre-proceedings with the accepted papers, printed locally in Lucca, will be made available at the conference. It is planned to dedicate a special issue of the journal Theoretical Computer Science to the theme of the workshop, comprised of extended versions of the best papers presented at TGC 2006.

Program

Download the Program in PDF format (44KB)

SPONSORS



 Fondazione Cassa di Risparmio di Lucca                Tagetik

LIST OF PARTICIPANTS



Soon available.

PICTURES


Thanks to Hubert Baumeister for making available some of the pictures in this page
-1 || strpos(strtolower($file), "jpeg") > -1 || strpos(strtolower($file), "png") > -1 || strpos(strtolower($file), "gif") > -1 ) { ?>  TGC 2006
 University of Pisa

 Information Society Technologies

SENSORIA - Software Engineering for Service-Oriented Overlay Computers

MOBIUS - Mobility, Ubiquity and Security

CATNETS - Evaluation of the Catallaxy Paradigm for Decentralized Operation of Dynamic Application Networks



 Fondazione Cassa di Risparmio di Lucca

 Tagetik